2019 WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Action for Wellbeing: The theory and practice of promoting mental wellbeing

Without mental health there is no health! It is a foundational pillar for wellbeing and resiliency in the individual, whānau, hapū, iwi and community.

Well individuals contribute to well whānau, schools and workplaces, communities, economies and society

Mental wellbeing is more than the mere absence of mental illness. It is the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face. It is a positive sense of emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing that respects the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity. It forms the basis on which individuals, whānau, hapū and iwi and communities are able to thrive.

Mental wellbeing is a holistic approach which is congruent with most indigenous and non-western  cultures’ understanding of health and wellbeing.  It is aligned to people’s aspiration of wellbeing for themselves and their whānau. For those living with a mental illness, wellbeing is a cornerstone of the recovery model.

The Government believes that wellbeing belongs at the heart of policymaking - 2019 Budget Statement

Informed by social, cultural and environmental determinants , adopting a wellbeing framework facilitates better engagement with non-health agencies, such as local government who can incorporate wellbeing outcomes in their policy development and programme delivery.

Vision for Mental Wellbeing

Thriving individuals who belong to supportive family, cultural and/or social networks, participating in and contributing to inclusive and safe communities

 

This two day workshop provides a comprehensive overview of the theory and the practice of promoting mental wellbeing. Drawing on over thirty years of working in mental wellbeing, Barry will provide a critical analysis of the social and cultural determinants of mental wellbeing. He will share his learnings from designing and implementing programmes including the pitfalls and solutions to common problems that arise in implementing such programmes. He will also present his proven model of collaborative partnerships using the principles of collective impact and transformational change which has been applied in numerous settings and populations.

Topics covered

  • Theoretical foundations of mental wellbeing

  • Social and cultural determinants of mental wellbeing

  • Ecological model of wellbeing - the role of place and environment

  • Mental wellbeing and climate change

  • Mental wellbeing indicators and outcomes

  • Population vs settings approaches to mental wellbeing

  • Mental wellbeing programme design, implementation and evaluation

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

  • Collaborative partnerships for wellbeing - whole of community approach

  • Application of mental wellbeing principles to broader health promotion strategies

 

Custodians of Hope: Supporting the suicidal person in non-mental health service settings

 

The primary aim of supporting the suicidal person is to engender a sense of hope and inviting the person to live

 

Identifying suicide risk is only one part of working with the suicidal person. The increasing demand on mental health services means that front line workers are often having to provide ongoing support for those assessed as not being in imminent danger of suicide. A recent Coroner's finding has highlighted the need for counsellors in private practice, NGO mental health support organisations and front-line health and social services to be up to date in their competency and capability to engage with the suicidal client and to have good referral processes in place.

 

Workshop participants will explore a model of engagement, support and safe containment post risk assessment. The steps of the model are:

  • Illumination

  • Interrupting the suicidal thought

  • Invitation to live

  • Anchoring

  • Restoring of Wairua

  • Custodian of Hope

  • Strategies for coping

 

This course would be particularly of value for those working in counselling or social support settings who have a basic understanding of counselling and/or mental health support/ recovery principles and processes. While the workshop is focused primarily around non-mental health settings, the workshop content is also relevant to workers in mental health settings.

 

Topics covered:

  • Overview of suicide and suicidal ideation

  • The Suicidal Moment

  • Custodian of hope model

  • Coping Planning vs Safety Panning

  • Safe Practice: Keeping the suicidal person safe physically, emotionally and culturally

  • Including whānau and significant others as part of the support team

  • Confidentiality, Duty of Care, Referral pathways, Privacy Act, Joint case management, inter-agency

Dealing with the Aftermath: Responding to the impact of a suicide

The impact of a suicide on whānau and hapū, friends, work colleagues and communities is both profound and enduring with many experiencing a more complicated grieving process that is compounded further by the stigma of suicide or mental illness.

Our understanding about effective suicide postvention is changing as more research and evaluation has been undertaken. Hear why suicide postvention specialist and programme evaluator, Barry Taylor believes there needs to be a review of how we deliver postvention services and where the focus should be. Barry, based on his suicide postvention work in Australia, conceptualised, designed and established the Wellington Region Suicide Postvention Response Service over 10 years ago, a model which is being used in other DHBs in New Zealand. As with many programmes there is always a challenge with replication and transferability of models. Drawing on the contemporary research and thinking in postvention Barry will offer an outcome framework for bereaved by suicide support and postvention response services to assess and review their suicide postvention response as well as the provision of suicide postvention in settings such as schools, mental health NGOs and workplaces.

Suicide brings a heightened risk of further suicide within whānau. Intergenerational suicide contagion is now recognised as an increased risk factor, with some research indicating that history of suicide in immediate family can increase suicide risk tenfold. Some whānau or hapū have had numerous family members, often young people, dying by suicide. Postvention response must focus just as much on intergenerational suicide as they do on addressing suicide clusters. It is essential that those providing support to those bereaved by suicide are not just competent in bereavement care but also in being able to assist individuals or the whānau to make sense of the death by suicide in ways that may lessen the potential of suicide contagion within the whānau. The same principles can be applied to settings such as schools, workplaces and communities.

This introductory workshop builds understanding of effective strategies to respond to a death by suicide in different settings: whānau & hapū, ethnic groupings, schools, workplaces, organisations and communities. The workshop also outlines the differences between suicide postvention and suicide bereavement support and hot best to manage the tensions between the two approaches as well as providing an overview of effective strategies for supporting those bereaved by suicide.

It is important to understand that suicide postvention is more than just about bereavement support. It also needs to be viewed in the context of the suicide prevention continuum. The principles, objectives and activities of suicide postvention will be discussed. In addition the assessing risk of contagion, postvention mapping, community postvention risk audit, developing an at-risk registry and the roles and responsibilities of community postvention action groups will be described in detail.

Topics covered

  • The impact of suicide on friends, families, agencies and community

  • Suicide specific grief and supporting those grieving

  • Suicide Contagion: What it is and why it occurs

  • Inter-generational suicide within family systems​

  • Principles objectives and activities of Suicide Postvention

  • Tensions between suicide postvention and bereaved by suicide support outcomes

  • Cultural considerations in providing a postvention response

  • Mapping those at risk of suicide, monitoring and support needs

  • Assessing risk of contagion, auditing community postvention capacity and capabilities, 

  • Suicide At-Risk Registry, monitoring and follow-up

  • Agency policies and procedures in the event of a death by suicide

  • Developing an organisation or community suicide postvention plan

Previous participants' feedback

Feedback from previous workshop participants stated that this workshop was very relevant and helpful to their work and that their knowledge, comfortableness, competency and confidence about suicide postvention had significantly increased. Participants were appreciative of the breadth and depth the topics covered and the practical approaches recommended and the use of real life scenarios.

 

“Real life examples and scenarios was helpful in seeing how the theory can be applied practically”      Social Worker

 

“Realise how unprepared I am should this happen but leave with practical strategies and insights”     School Dean

“Fabulous day, information and trainer…Outstanding knowledge and experience”     Youth Counsellor

"Guidance on how communities should observe a suicide death are very much in line with tikanaga on marae and how we as Maori tangi.  Very useful for maraes to consider."      Kaumātua

People who would benefit from attending this workshop are:

Bereaved by suicide support groups                                                                     Clergy and Funeral Celebrants                                           

Corrections and Juvenile Justices institutions                                                       Education and training organisations

Iwi health and welfare services                                                                           Loss and grief services - especially bereaved by suicide

Mental health services and mental health support NGOs                                    Older people services

Police and First Responder Emergency Services                                                    Rural support agencies

Safer Community Councils                                                                                    School counsellors, leadership team, deans, pastoral care, boarding hostel managers

Suicide prevention and postvention co-ordinators                                               Tertiary student health & counselling services, chaplaincy, halls of residence managers

Victim Support                                                                                                      Welfare agencies

Workplace EAP Programs and HR Departments                                                    Workplace Support

Youth Services

Equal Not the Same: LGBTTIA+ inclusive Practice

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, takatāpui, transgender, intersex, queer/questioning, asexual and people of other diverse sexual and gender identifications (LGBTTIQA+) people are over represented in the statistics for people living with a mental illness, an addiction or have died by suicide.  Given there are no dedicated LGBTTIQA+ mental health or addictions services in Aotearoa, it is essential that mainstream services, mental health NGO organisations, student health and counselling services and private counselling practitioners ensure that their services and programmes are LGBTTIQA+ inclusive.

 

LGBTTIQA+ people report that their experience of mainstream services is that they are not inclusive and operate mainly from a heteronormative worldview.  They often felt vulnerable in disclosing issues around their sexuality or gender and often had to educate the clinicians and counsellors about sexuality or gender diversity.

 

A common view held within services is that there is no need for targeted programmes for specific populations as the service “treats everyone the same.”  This workshop will define clearly what is meant by inclusive practice for LGBTTIQA+ people and put forward the rationale as to why mainstream services need to consider their responsiveness to LGBTTIQA+ population. Participants will apply the priniciples inclusiveness from the perspectives of organisational inclusiveness and clinical practice

Learning Outcomes

Participants will:

  • Have a working knowledge of the principles of cultural competence and cultural safety as applied to LGBTTIQA+ persons

  • Assess current service delivery against key principles, criteria and recommended actions for LGBTTIQA+ inclusiveness to their service provision

  • Identify opportunities and challenges for improving LGBTTIQA+ inclusive practice in their organisation

  • Be familiarised with the considered practice wisdom in delivering clinical and support services to LGBTTIQA+ people

​Topics covered:

  • Unpacking LGBTTIA+ – Sexuality, Sex and Gender

  • Intersections not collisions - Intersectionality of gender, sexuality, culture and religion

  • Mad, Bad or Sad – The determinants that contribute to positive and poor mental health outcomes in LGBTTIQA+ people

  • Equal but not the Same – What do we mean by Inclusive Practice 

  • LGBTTIQA+ Cultural Competency and Safety – What does it look like?

  • How inclusive is Inclusive – Principles of Inclusive Practice

  • Auditing your service or clinical practice for LGBTTIQA+ inclusive practices

  • Strategies for implementing inclusive practice into organisations and clinical practice

  • Inclusive Practitioners - LGBTTIQA+ practice wisdom

 

This workshop has been delivered to mental health and addiction services across Australia with very positive feedback. Evaluation of the workshop relevance shows that attendance at this workshop is of benefit for workers in the mental health, addiction, primary health, social and community services, education, youth sectors.

 

Previous participants' feedback

“The clinical examples using the broader sociological lens made the course so much more relevant and of use to all clinicians. Will recommend it to all my colleagues and hope the rest of my team attends"     Psychiatrist

“This course should be part of all mental health nurses training. Informative, relevant and valuable"     Mental Health Nurse

 

“Now realise how much I failed to appreciate the significance of certain life events of rainbow clients I have worked with”      Addiction Worker

 

"The highly skilled presenter with a wealth of knowledge and experience meant I could be confident in the content"     Clinical Psychologist

From Sad Blokes to Well Men: Changing the focus in the prevention of male suicide and depression

 

 

 

 

 

TaylorMade Training and Consulting offers the opportunity to hear from an internationally respected commentator and suicidologist, Barry Taylor.  Learn more about the phenomenon of suicide in men and what needs to be done locally and nationally to address the ongoing upward trend in the numbers of men experiencing depression amd anxiety or ending their lives.

Based on 30 years’ experience of working with men who are depressed and suicidal and drawing on the latest international research findings, Barry offers a conceptual framework from which to analyse the phenomenon of depression and suicide in men and to develop targeted and effective evidence-based strategies and programmes based on sound epidemiological data. An essential element of this framework is to critique the underling assumptions that currently inform our understanding of suicide and whether these reflect the lived reality of men in 2019. It calls for a paradigmatic change with a greater emphasis on inviting men on a wellness journey from depression and despair to being well men. to enhancing men’s wellbeing and promoting strength-based strategies that assist men to navigate through times of distress and crisis.  Barry also offers his personal insights as a man who has lived with depression for many years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This workshop draws on sociology and gender studies to broaden our understanding of suicide in men. It will examine how men's wellbeing has been impacted by the rapid changes over the past 50 years in society’s expectations of men and their traditional roles as well as the notions of masculinity as well as contributed to the rise in suicide. For example, the stereotypical notion of the staunch man who is strong, resilient and self-sufficient is a much greater impediment to men seeking help than is the stigma of mental illness or suicide. Social and cultural factors such as gender, ethnicity, age and sexuality, social and economic disparities, colonisation and intergenerational trauma are just as critical as psychological factors in assessing risk in men.

  • Explore how social, cultural and psychological factors contribute to depression and suicide in men

  • Update your knowledge about strategies that have been shown to be effective in improving the wellbeing of men

  • Understand more how men make sense and deal with their depression or suicidality

  • Enhance your skills to support a depressed or suicidal man

  • Identitfy opportunities for local community action to respond to depression and suicide in men

  • Understand how inter-generational suicide of other males within whānau and social networks are contributing to current suicide rates. 

  • Learn of approaches that assist men to navigate through times of distress and suicidal crisis.

Topics covered:

  • Overview of depression and anxiety and suicide in men

  • The phenomenon of suicide and the theoretical assumptions that underpin our understanding of why men kill themselves

  • The Suicidal Moment - Men's thoughts, emotions and behaviour in the "suicidal moment”

  • Data informed prevention: Identifying the trends and the most at risk male populations across all age and cultural groupings to ensure better targeted prevention activities. 

  • Masculinity for the 21st Century - Are traditional notions of masculinity meeting the needs of men in 2019 and how the changes in men’s roles and identity contribute to the persistently high rates of depression and suicide  in men

  • Explanations of why we are now seeing within whānau and hapū intergenerational suicide among the men

  • A vision for men’s wellbeing: An holistic approach to conceptualising men’s wellbeing and key mental wellbeing messages for men

Target Audience

This workshop is suitable for clinical and non-clinical workers. Research shows that the workers in non-health setting are more likely to be wellbeing champions and/ or engage with depressed and suicidal men. For this reason, having 'first point of call' workers who are knowledgeable about men's wellbeing and confident and competent in responding to the distressed or suicidal male has proven highly effective. Workers from a wide range of sectors are encouraged to attend.

Previous participants' feedback

"The best and most informative workshop I have attended in 27 years of mental health nursing”     Community Mental Health Nurse

"This workshop should be compulsory for anyone working with men”     Male Family Violence Worker

"It was as if Barry was talking about every young man I see at school”     School Counsellor

"I have lots more insights about depressed and suicidal men and gained some useful ideas of how work with the men in my community”     Community Worker

"Thanks for being so inclusive of older men. They are so often forgotten”     Aged Care Worker

"I appreciated how inclusive the presenter was of different cultures and his analysis of how culture influences what it means to be a man”     Refugee Health Worker

"Most helpful workshop I have been to in regards to suicide”     Program Facilitator, Mental Health Recovery Service

Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool Training

Refer to the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment page

 

 

Our Wellbeing is our Wealth: Putting wellbeing at the heart of policymaking, planning and service delivery

Wellbeing Budget - An overview of wellbeing 

As government priorities are implemented wellbeing measures and deliverables will become part of funding agreements with NGOs, community and social service, health and education sectors. 

Become more familiar with wellbeing principles, and how Government is defining and measuring wellbeing. An opportunity to look at how to orient services and programmes to a wellbeing focus. 

Hear from an experienced wellbeing specialist who has lectured and implemented numerous wellbeing programmes at the local, national and international levels

Wellbeing

Wellbeing is defined as the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face. It recognises the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity. It forms the basis on which individuals, whānau, hapū and iwi and communities are able to thrive.

Well individuals contribute to well whānau, communities, schools and workplaces, economies and society

Public policy, the economy, community resilience and assets, the legal and justice systems, urban planning, the environment and human rights all impact on wellbeing. Self determination, social agency, participation and connection, safe and inclusive communities are key determinants for thriving. Assessing the impact of public policy and programmes on wellbeing contributes to a more thriving, inclusive and equitable society.

Workshop Description

There has been much national and international interest in the Government’s Wellbeing Budget. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of what is meant by wellbeing economics and the measures that Government are using to measure the country’s wellbeing. The principles of wellbeing and how they inform and shape policy and programmes will be examined as well as how a wellbeing focus contributes to reducing social and economic disparities.

 

Wellbeing is much more than a warm subjective feeling. It is determined by proven social, economic and cultural factors that positively or negatively impact on the wellbeing of individuals and communities. There are several internationally recognised wellbeing models and frameworks as well as local models such as Whare Tapa Whā. Based on these determinants and frameworks it is possible to develop an evidence-based programme logic with clear wellbeing outcomes and indicators and evaluation tools. The determinants, frameworks and outcomes will be covered comprehensively in the workshop with particular focus on Treasury’s Living Standards Framework.

 

It will offer a framework for organisations to apply a wellbeing lens to its work and deliverables as well and wellbeing outcomes and indicators

Tools such as the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool provides a systematic approach to assessing the impact of public policy, resource management and planning and programme delivery on mental wellbeing. A summary of the tool will be given.

This workshop would be of value to:

  • Local Government agencies

  • District Health Boards

  • Public health services

  • Iwi health and social service

  • Social service organisations

  • NGOS

  • Advocacy organisations

  • Trade Unions

  • Youth services

Topics covered

  • Defining Wellbeing

  • Wellbeing Economy - What the government means

  • Wellbeing models and frameworks

  • Social and cultural determinants of wellbeing

  • Measuring Wellbeing - Indicators and outcomes

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

  • Applying wellbeing principles to policy, planning and service delivery

 

Response: Mental wellbeing, trauma, depression and suicide in first responders

“First responder mental health is a state of well-being in which a worker realises his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life and work, can work productively and is able to continue to make a contribution to her or his community.”

Mental Health & Wellbeing Strategy for First Responder Organisations in NSW

The mental health and wellbeing of staff and members must be a key priority for all first responder organisations. First responders are workers who first respond to emergency situations such as Fire, Police, Ambulance, Civil Defence and air rescue services. They are routinely exposed to a range of factors that can increase the risk of mental health problems, including trauma, conflict, lack of control over their work or volunteer environment and unusual working hours. The cumulative trauma exposure experienced by first responders is a unique challenge. Regular exposure to trauma is an unavoidable consequence of the first responder role, but is known to be a risk factor for a range of mental health problems. There has been an increase in the numbers of first responder staff with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) who are on extended sick leave or leaving their jobs due to occupation related permanent disability as well as first responders dying by suicide.

There is a range of barriers that may prevent first responders asking for help when needed. These include stigma, embarrassment, lack of knowledge, uncertainty regarding treatment options or concerns regarding the impact seeking help may have on their career. Delays in seeking help can prolong suffering and make recovery more complicated. There is a range of ways in which first responder organisations can seek to reduce barriers to help seeking, including stigma reduction initiatives, mental health education and peer support programs. Managers, team leaders, chaplains and human resource staff all play a key role in assisting staff and members 

 

First responder organisation should ensure they are promoting and facilitating best treatment practices for their members and staff. First responders also have a responsibility to seek out treatment when needed and to work in partnership with treating clinicians.

 

This workshop provides an overview of how first responder organisations can be instrumental in reducing the risk of mental disorders and suicide as well as promoting wellbeing and resilience in their staff.  It equips participants with a comprehensive understanding of trauma related depression and suicide and how to recognise and respond to individuals experiencing mental health difficulties.  Participants will examine the particular challenges of suicide in first responders and what the evidence suggests are best practice in supporting staff experiencing severe psychological distress.

 

With the government identifying wellbeing and mental health as priorities, the workshop will outline the key determinants of staff wellbeing for first responders and the policies, programmes and systems the facilitate mentally well workplaces.

 

Topics covered:

  • Overview of the phenomenon of suicide and the "suicide moment"

  • Workplace wellbeing strategies for first responder organisations

  • Sad Misery and Depression - Identifying the difference

  • Being strong - Attitudes to mental health and help seeking in male dominant work cultures

  • Trauma and PTSD

  • Past childhood trauma and exposure to work related trauma

  • Impact of work related trauma on partners and family

  • Creating supportive environment for staff

  • Supporting a staff member with trauma related conditions

 

 

Risky Business: The art of assessing suicide risk and imminent danger

 

 

 

Undertaking a suicide risk assessment is not without its complexities. One size does not fit all. This advanced level workshop provides the opportunity for participants to depth their knowledge and competency in the “art” of assessment and management of suicide through empathetic dialogue rather than a more traditional assessment interview process.  Participants will explore how factors such as nuance, context, culture, gender, socio-economic background, the quality and length of the therapeutic relationship impact on the process and the outcomes of an assessment.

 

This advanced level workshop builds on foundational or gatekeeper suicide prevention training and provides the opportunity for participants to depth their critical analysis of suicide risk factors and reflect on their practice in assessing risk. The content of the workshop investigates in detail the rationale and research that informs risk assessment items. This assists participants to more able to confidently and competently adapt the content and process of the assessment to best meet the context and the needs of the client, particularly in crisis situations.  It also facilitates greater depth of enquiry and does not constrain the practitioner to questions on the assessment sheet.

 

Elements essential for a good assessment are Rapport, Dialogue, Confidence, Competence

 

Evaluation of this training indicated that the content of this course is both relevant and applicable to the work of mental health clinicians; primary health clinicians; mental health support workers; counsellors and therapists in private practice; school counsellors; frontline health, social service and community workers.

 

Topics covered:

  • Overview of the phenomenon of suicide and the 'suicidal moment'

  • What is meant by suicide risk? - Predisposing, Precipitating and Perpetuating Risk Factors

  • The art of suicide risk assessment: The critical role of the human interaction and empathetic listening

  • A holistic approach to assessment - taking into account physical, emotional, cultural, socio-economic, and spiritual factors or influencers

  • Contextualising the suicidal thought or act

  • Asking the question to get the answer: Integrating assessment questions into a counselling/support context

  • Discussing suicide with a client and making sense of the suicidal narrative

  • Imminent danger? moving beyond assessing risk to assessing protective factors

  • Coping vs Safety Planning

Previous participants' feedback

“I have learnt more about risk assessment in this workshop than I have learnt cfrom all the suicide prevention workshops I have attended combined”     Counsellor

“Appreciated how you constantly drew upon the participants’ experience.  Will leave thinking / reflecting on my current practice”      School Counsellor

“Gave me new insights into something I do everyday”      Mental Health Clinician

A must attend for counsellors”      Counsellor

 

 

Suicide and Assisted Dying: The difference is more than just wording

The private member’s bill to legalise assisted dying in this country has evoked a very passionate and at times heated public discussion about whether people have the right to end their life at a time of their choosing and, if so, under what circumstances. It presents a combination of philosophical, moral, legal and ethical dilemmas which cannot be answered solely by one of these domains.

This workshop provides participants an opportunity to explore this complex interrelationship of factors as a way of clarifying the differences between the narrative of the suicidal person vis a vis the person wishing to determine their imminent death due to terminal illness. This clarification is critical as each narrative requires quite distinct and different response by professionals.

The meaning of death for the suicidal person is also not singular ranging from desire to escape intolerable ‘psych ache” through to the existential sense that life has not meaning nor purpose. Also to be covered are the issues of the lack of quality of life as a justification for ending one’s life especially those experiencing chronic mental illness or non-terminal illnesses such as chronic pain.

The issues for those bereaved by suicide or assisted dying will also be covered as once again there are both differences and similarities in people’s responses to the deaths.  Bereavement related suicidality will also be covered.

The workshop is an exploration of the issues rather than the presentation of definitive answers. There will be opportunity for open discussion and the raising of issues for group consideration. 

Designed specifically for those working in hospice, palliative care and loss and grief support, it allows for those from these sectors to collectively examine these issues from the philosophical approach of palliative and hospice care and the tensions that arise with the issues of assisted dying or suicide.

 

Topics covered:

  • The phenomenon of suicide – its meaning and the narrative of despair

  • Assisted Dying - What it is and and why it is such a dilemma

  • When does it stop being assisted suicide and becomes suicidality?

  • Depression and dying

  • Drawing the line – who we allow to voluntarily end their life and who we don’t allow

  • Quality of life and the existential motivator for living

  • Supporting those bereaved by suicide and assisted dying

  • Bereavement related suicidality
     

Who should Attend

This workshop would be of value to:

  • Hospice workers

  • Nurses

  • Palliative care physicians

  • District Nurses

  • Allied health professionals

  • Counsellors and therapists

  • Chaplains and pastoral care workers

  • Grief support group facilitators

  • Workers from illness based support organisations - e.g. Cancer Society

  • Volunteers

 

 

The Suicide Closet: Effective suicide interventions for LGBTTIQA+ people

Depth your knowledge and skills in responding safely and inclusively to LGBTTIQA+ people experiencing severe psychological distress or at risk of self harm or suicidal behaviour.  Hear from an award winning suicidoligist who lead MindOUT: LGBTI Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Project in Australia. MindOUT was a world first where the government had funded a national response to LGBTTIA+ mental health and suicide prevention as part of a national suicide prevention strategy.

Studies have shown that for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, takatāpui, intersex, queer/questioning, asexual and people of other diverse sexual and gender identifications self harm and the thinking about suicide; attempting suicide and dying by suicide is far more common than in the broader population. This workshop provides insights of how the lived experience of LGBTTIA+ people, internalised stigma, hetero and trans normative and a theoretical analysis of the social and psychological determinants that influence suicide risk in LGBTTIQA+ people and what workers need to consider when undertaking a suicide risk assessment, providing crisis intervention or providing long-term support or therapy/counselling with LGBTTIQA+ people experiencing suicidal ideation or behavior.

​Learning Outcomes:

Workshop participants will be:

  • Knowledgeable of the social and psychological determinants that contribute to suicide risk and behaviour in LGBTTIQA+ people

  • Familiar with specific LGBTTIQA+ risk and protective factors to consider in a suicide risk assessment

  • Conscious of LGBTTIQA+ specific dynamics that may affect crisis interventions and longer-term support or clinical interventions with LGBTTIQA+ people experiencing suicidal ideation or behaviour

  • Cognisant of the grief issues and suicide contagion risk for LGBTTIQA+ people bereaved by suicide

​Topics covered:

  • Suicide in LGBTTIQA+ people – What is it and how is it explained

  • The role of social determinants in contributing to poor mental health outcomes and suicidality in LGBTTIQA+ people

  •  Not all the same -  understanding age, gender and cultural differences in LGBTTIQA+ suicide

  • Risk and Protective Factors for suicide in LGBTTIQA+ people – Additional considerations when undertaking suicide risk assessment in LGBTTIQA+ people

  • Intervention and support - Issues to consider when working with LGBTTIQA+ people experiencing suicidal ideation or behaviour.

  • Suicide contagion in LGBTTIQA+ communities

 

Evaluation of this workshop shows that attendance is of benefit for LGBTTIQA+ service providers and workers in mental health, community health, primary health, social and community services, education, youth sectors.

 

Previous participants' feedback

“The easy to understand explanations of trans and intersex was most helpful and shed light on the experiences of groups that I knew little about”     Clinical Psychologist

“Your openness and style of presentation created a safe environment to ask questions and for honest group discussion”     Mental Health Nurse

“I wish there had been a course like this when I first started working in mental health.  I have learnt so much”      Social Worker
“Leaving even more determined to ensure my school is a a safe place for our LGBTI students”      School Counsellor

 

Thriving Citizens living in Well Communities: A wellbeing focus for local government

Understanding the Wellbeing Budget - An overview of wellbeing

With the Wellbeing Budget, the government has placed wellbeing at the centre of his social and economic policy.  An essential element of wellbeing is well social environments and communities.  Become more familiar with wellbeing principles, and how Government is defining and measuring wellbeing. An opportunity to look at how to orient long term community plans, recreation facilities, public transport and urban development to a wellbeing framework.

 

Hear from an experienced wellbeing specialist who has lectured and implemented numerous wellbeing programmes at the local, national and international levels

 

Wellbeing

Wellbeing is defined as the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face. It recognises the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity. It forms the basis on which individuals, whānau, hapū and iwi and communities are able to thrive. Well individuals contribute to well whānau, communities, schools and workplaces, economies and society.

 

Public policy, the economy, community resilience and assets, the legal and justice systems, urban planning, the environment and human rights all impact on wellbeing. Self-determination, social agency, participation and connection, safe and inclusive communities, social cohesiveness and social capital are key determinants for thriving. Assessing the impact of public policy and programmes on wellbeing contributes to a more thriving, inclusive and equitable society.

 

Workshop Description

There has been much national and international interest in the Government’s Wellbeing Budget. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of what is meant by wellbeing economics and the measures that Government are using to measure the country’s wellbeing. The principles of wellbeing and how they inform and shape local government planning, services and urban growth will be examined as well as how a wellbeing focus contributes to social cohesiveness and community wellness.

Wellbeing is much more than a warm subjective feeling. It is determined by proven social, economic and cultural factors that positively or negatively impact on the wellbeing of individuals and communities. There are several internationally recognised wellbeing models and frameworks as well as local models such as Whare Tapa Whā. Based on these determinants and frameworks it is possible to develop an evidence-based programme logic with clear wellbeing outcomes and indicators and evaluation tools. The determinants, frameworks and outcomes will be covered comprehensively in the workshop with particular focus on Treasury’s Living Standards Framework.

It will offer a framework for local government to apply a wellbeing lens to its work and deliverables as well and wellbeing outcomes and indicators. As a case study, participants will explore what future planning will be required to maintain the wellbeing of coastal or drought prone communities that are likely to be impacted by climate change or reoccurring extreme weather events.

Tools such as the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool provides a systematic approach to assessing the impact of public policy, resource management and planning and programme delivery on mental wellbeing. A summary of the tool will be given.

 

This workshop would be of value to:

  • Local and regional councils 

  • Public health services

  • Iwi Trust Boards

  • Safer Community Councils

 

Topics covered:

  • Defining Wellbeing

  • Wellbeing Economy - What the government means

  • Wellbeing models and frameworks

  • Social and cultural determinants of wellbeing

  • Measuring Wellbeing - Indicators and outcomes

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

  • Applying wellbeing principles to long term community plans, recreation facilities, public transport and urban development

  • Wellbeing in the era of Climate Change

Thriving Not Dying:  Lessons learnt in the prevention of youth suicide

 

The suicide of a young person has a devastating impact on all those connected. Despite numerous initiatives, we have seen in recent years an upward trend in the rates of suicide in young people, particularly for Māori young men.

There is much media coverage and community concern about youth suicide with demands that more needs to be done to prevent such deaths.  In the past thirty years we have seen the undertaking a large body of research that has lead to a much greater of understanding of suicide and self harm in young people. There has been numerous national prevention strategies developed as well as a large range of community led programmes delivered. Yet the suicide rate in some youth populations has not significantly dropped and in fact has risen, e.g. Māori rangatahi. This must cause us to pause and critically review what has been done and to learn from the research and the lessons from previous programmes and strategies. One learning is that many programmes were developed with little evidence of efficacy or rigorous evaluation. While there is no argument about the need to address the unacceptably high rates of youth suicide, the challenge is to identify the most effective strategies to implement.

 

Due to the complexity of the inter-relating factors that influence suicidal behaviour in young people the prevention of such deaths is challenging. It is critical that our prevention strategies are evidence-based and address the underlying factors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This workshop will provide an overview of these factors and what has been shown to be effective prevention and intervention strategies. Based on thirty years of working with suicidal young people, Barry will offer a critique of current suicide prevention initiatives, providing insights into:

  • The phenomenon of suicide in young people – What is it and how is it explained

  • Gender and cultural trends in youth suicide

  • The inculturation of suicidal thinking and behaviour in youth culture

  • To talk or not to talk about suicide debate- an overview of the different perspectives and the pro and cons of each perspective

  • Current and future trends of suicide in young people - the increase of suicide in young women, Pacific Island and why young Maori suicide remains consistently and disproportionately high

  • The changing dynamics of suicidality in young people - making sense of their suicide narrative

  • The correlation between mood disorders and suicide

  • The rise of trauma related suicide

  • Suicide contagion & inter-generational suicide

Previous participants' feedback

“I found the workshop inspiring and thought provoking. Much to reflect upon about my own practice”      Youth Mental Health Nurse

“Loved the positive focus, very intelligent and informed speaker. Best training I’ve had on suicide”      Youth AOD Nurse

“So glad I had the opportunity to attend such a high quality and informed workshop”      School Counsellor

“A must attend for anyone working with young people”      Youth Worker

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mental wellbeing is deeply connected to wider wellbeing in our society. We need to embed this understanding in everything we do – within our mental health and addiction system, our wider health and social system, and at every level of society. 

He Ara Oranga – Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry Report

IT'S TIME TO TAKE DEPRESSION AND SUICIDE IN MEN OUT OF THE TOO HARD BASKET

BE PART OF THE SOLUTION

Well men matter 

 

It matters that men are able to optimise their wellbeing.                                 It matters that men are over-represented in poor mental health and suicide statistics. 

Well men contribute to a well society.                                                                                   Equally unwell men affect the wellbeing of whānau, communities and society.  

 

Helping men and boys to transition from dead or sad blokes to well men must be our focus

Effective youth suicide prevention strategies:

  • results in thriving rangatahi with a strong sense hope and purpose that live and participate in caring and safe whānau and communities,

  • targeted at sub populations of young people most at risk of suicide

  • timely and appropriate support and therapeutic interventions for young people who are in imminent danger of suicide

  • based on the principles of manaakitanga, whānau ora and wellbeing 

  • informed by cultural wisdom and proven evidence-based knowledge

 
 

"The person who suicides puts his or her psychological skeleton in the survivor's emotional closet - he/she sentences the survivor to a complex of negative feelings and, most importantly, to obsessing about the reasons for the suicide death"

Edwin S. Shneidman, Founding Suicidologist

Recent coroners’ findings highlighted the importance of practitioners, especially counsellors in private practice, regularly updating their knowledge and competency in suicide risk assessment

 
 
 
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Me mahi tahi tautou mo te oranga o te katoa   -  Work together for the wellbeing of everyone

 

Contact Details                                                                                                                                                            Helplines

Email:                  barry@taylormadetrainingconsulting.com                                                                                                                                      Having suicidal thoughts?

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