Wellbeing

The Government believes wellbeing belongs at the heart of policymaking.
Budget 2019 Policy Statement

WB1:  Action for Wellbeing: The theory and the practice of promoting mental wellbeing

 

The government’s strong focus on wellbeing has created a greater awareness of the key role of wellbeing in enabling individuals and communities to thrive. Well individuals contribute to well whānau, schools and workplaces, communities, economies and society.

It is commonly stated that there is no health without mental health, as it is considered a foundational pillar for wellbeing and resiliency. Mental wellbeing is more than the mere absence of mental illness. It is the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face. It is a positive sense of emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing that respects the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity.

Mental wellbeing is a holistic approach which is congruent with most indigenous and non-western cultures understanding of health and wellbeing. It is aligned to people’s aspiration of wellbeing for themselves and their whānau. For those living with a mental illness, wellbeing is a cornerstone of the recovery model.

Informed by social, cultural and environmental determinants, adopting a wellbeing framework enables non-health agencies, such as local government, identify how they can be "agents of wellbeing" and so incorporate wellbeing outcomes in their policy development and programme delivery.

Workshop Description

This two day workshop provides a comprehensive overview of the theory and the practice of promoting mental wellbeing in communities and different settings – workplaces and schools. Using the latest research and evidence of efficacy, emphasis will be on participants being able to apply the theory to the practical application in their work context as well as being able to critique and assess the efficacy of different approaches to promoting mental wellbeing.

 

Drawing on over thirty years of working in mental wellbeing, learnings from designing, implementing and evaluating mental wellbeing programmes including the pitfalls and solutions to common problems that arise will be shared. Participants will have the opportunity to identify a set of wellbeing outcomes and apply them to a wellbeing programme logic. A proven model of collaborative partnerships using the principles of collective impact and transformational change which has been applied in numerous settings and populations will also be examined.

 

Day 1:                                                                                                                      

  • Theoretical foundations of mental wellbeing

  • The Wheel of Wellbeing (WOW) model

  • Social and cultural determinants of wellbeing

  • Ecological model of wellbeing - the role of place and environment

  • The difference between a mental illness and a mental wellbeing approach

  • Application of mental wellbeing principles to broader health promotion strategies

 

Day 2:

  • Population vs settings approaches to mental wellbeing

  • Mental wellbeing indicators and outcomes - developing a programme logic 

  • Mental wellbeing programme design, implementation and evaluation

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

  • Collaborative partnerships for wellbeing - whole of community approach

Workshop Locations in 2020

Click on location for workshop details and online registration

Feedback from other participants

“Barry’s ability to translate research findings into everyday language means I have a much clearer understanding of the principles of wellbeing and how to apply it to my work”

Community Worker

“Barry’s understanding of various cultural models of wellbeing meant I felt included and my culture respected”

Pacific Island Community Leader

“I now have a better understanding of the role of local government in promoting wellbeing and useful strategies on how to apply mental wellbeing outcomes to our Community Plan”

Council Policy Officer

“A holistic approach to wellbeing which included the spiritual dimension”

Church Minister

“So glad I came. Going away with heaps of knowledge and know how to apply in our workplace wellbeing plan. Fantastic opportunity to learn from someone so experienced and knowledgeable ”

Health & Safety and Wellbeing Manager

“Your passion for mental wellbeing made this a thoroughly stimulating workshop”

Health Promoter

“Really appreciated the sociological analysis and your understanding of the impact of inequality, marginalisation and discrimination on people’s wellbeing”

Social Justice Advocate

“Most helpful workshop I have attended in a very long time”

Wellbeing Programme Facilitator

 

WB2: Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool Training

Facilitating healthy public policy through systematic assessment

 Become competent in undertaking a mental wellbeing impact assessment. Register for the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool six-day training program. In 2020, TaylorMade will be offering the training program in Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin.  For more information on the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool and the training programme click here

 

WB3: More Than an apple a day:  Well Staff in Well Schools

A one day course for staff in schools or tertiary and  vocational institutions

Designed for professional development days, this practical workshop provides the opportunity for staff in educational and vocational institutions to take stock of their wellbeing in the context of their work.  Drawing on a comprehensive understanding of the research on wellbeing and a critical analysis of the efficacy of workplace wellbeing programmes, the workshop provides ten key principles that facilitate improved mental wellbeing and resiliency for staff. 

This workshop is available on request. Contact TMTC for further information.

Mental wellbeing is deeply connected to wider wellbeing in our society. We need to embed this understanding in everything we do – within our mental health and addiction system, our wider health and social system, and at every level of society. 

 

He Ara Oranga – Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry Report

 

WB4: Our Wellbeing is our Wealth: Putting wellbeing at the heart of policymaking, planning and service delivery

As government priorities are implemented wellbeing measures and deliverables will increasingly become part of funding agreements with NGOs, community and social service, health and education sectors. 

Become more familiar with wellbeing principles, and how Government is defining and measuring wellbeing. An opportunity to look at how to orient services and programmes to a wellbeing focus. 

Hear from an experienced wellbeing specialist who has lectured and implemented numerous wellbeing programmes at the local, national and international levels

Wellbeing

Wellbeing is defined as the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face. It recognise the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity. It forms the basis on which individuals, whānau, hapū and iwi and communities are able to thrive.

Public policy, the economy, community resilience and assets, the legal and justice systems, urban planning, the environment and human rights all impact on wellbeing. Self determination, social agency, participation and connection, safe and inclusive communities are key determinants for thriving. Assessing the impact of public policy and programmes on wellbeing contributes to a more thriving, inclusive and equitable society.

Workshop Description

Government has strongly signalled there centrality of wellbeing to its social and economic policies. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of what is meant by wellbeing economics and the measures that Government are using to measure the country’s wellbeing. The principles of wellbeing and how they inform and shape policy and programmes will be examined as well as how a wellbeing focus contributes to reducing social and economic disparities.

Wellbeing is much more than a warm subjective feeling. It is determined by proven social, economic and cultural factors that positively or negatively impact on the wellbeing of individuals and communities. There are several internationally recognised wellbeing models and frameworks as well as local models such as Whare Tapa Whā. Based on these determinants and frameworks it is possible to develop an evidence-based programme logic with clear wellbeing outcomes and indicators and evaluation tools. The determinants, frameworks and outcomes will be covered comprehensively in the workshop with particular focus on Treasury’s Living Standards Framework.

 

It will offer a framework for organisations to apply a wellbeing lens to its work and deliverables as well and wellbeing outcomes and indicators

Tools such as the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool provides a systematic approach to assessing the impact of public policy, resource management and planning and programme delivery on mental wellbeing. A summary of the tool will be given.

Topics covered

  • Defining Wellbeing

  • Wellbeing Economy - What the government means

  • Wellbeing models and frameworks

  • Social and cultural determinants of wellbeing

  • Measuring Wellbeing - Indicators and outcomes

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

  • Applying wellbeing principles to policy, planning and service delivery

This workshop would be of value to:

  • Local Government agencies

  • District Health Boards

  • Public health services

  • Iwi health and social service

  • Social service organisations

  • NGOS

  • Advocacy organisations

  • Trade Unions

  • Youth services

WB5: Teaching Well: Supportive schools for a well staff

In recent years there has been a signifcant increase in school teaching staff and senior leadership reporting fatigue, psychological distress, burnout, depression and trauma as well as an alarming increase in suicide. While the primary focus of most schools has been on the mental health issues and wellbeing of the student body, it is timely that greater attention is paid to not only the welfare of staff but also their wellbeing.  

 

Workplace wellbeing has become the new buzzword and there is now a plethora of workplace wellbeing programmes being offered. However what is meant by workplace wellbeing in many of these programmes is not often clearly defined with the majority of the programmes having a “stress /mental illness” focus rather than wellbeing. While giving individual staff resources to cope more effectively with the stressful or distressing aspects of their jobs or providing an employee assistance programme can be part of a staff wellbeing initiative, it is only one small part at the remedial end of such an initiative. There is also little evidence around the efficacy of many workplace wellbeing programmes.

Schools are encouraged to send more than one staff member to the workshop as there are workshop activities that focus on applying the key points of the workshop to the participants’ school context Past workshops has shown that having more than one staff member has maximised the benefit of the workshop activities which can then been continued post-workshop. Representatives from Boards of Trustees would also benefit from attending this workshop.

 

Who should attend:  

  • Senior leadership team members (especially those with responsibility of staff wellbeing)

  • OHS representatives or union delegates

  • Heads of Departments

  • Boards of Trustees representatives

  • School Counsellors / EAP providers

 

This workshop can also be delivered in-house, school clusters, or organisations such as prinicpal assocations or unions.  Post workshop consulting services such as mentoring the development of or reviewing a staff wellbeing plan can also be provided.

 

 

This practical workshop provides the opportunity to learn about:

  • what is meant by wellbeing and its role in addressing stress and mental distress in staff

  • the difference between a welfare and a wellbeing approach

  • staff wellbeing as an industrial relations / conditons of employment issue

  • resilience, coping, and thriving? - desired wellbeing outcomes

  • the interface between personal and professional stressors and distressors

  • the impact on staff wellbeing from exposure to trauma and poor mental wellbeing within the student body

  • workplace and parental bullying

  • primary and secondary trauma, vicarious trauma

  • the difference between stress, fatigue, burnout and depression in the workplace

  • the key determinants that facilitate wellbeing in the teaching environment

  • what does and what doesn’t contribute to a supportive environment where staff thrive

  • the key components that should be in a staff wellbeing programme

  • designing, implementing and evaluating a staff wellbeing programme

Workshop Locations in 2020

Click on location for workshop details and online registration

 

WB6: Thriving Citizens in Well Communities: Local government as agents of Wellbeing

It has long been recognised that local government is a key player  in creating the conditions for material wellbeing. It does this through increasing employment opportunities, regenerating the physical environment and strengthening the local economy. But more recent evidence also highlights the importance of nurturing psycho-social wellbeing so to build strong and resilient communities and for its citizens to thrive.  

 

Wellbeing is much more than a warm subjective feeling. It is determined by proven social, economic and cultural factors that positively or negatively impact on the wellbeing of individuals and communities. Defined as the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance our ability to enjoy life and respond to the challenges we face, it recognises the importance of culture, diversity, equity, social justice and personal dignity. It forms the basis on which individuals, whānau, hapū and iwi and communities are able to thrive.

 

Public policy, the economy, community resilience and assets, urban planning, transport, the physical environment and public space are just some of the determinants that impact on the wellbeing of individuals, whānau and communities.  These and other determinants are part of the “core business” of local government therefore council policies, planning and programmes are more likely to directly influence the wellbeing of its citizens, even more than those of central government.

 

Self-determination, social agency, participation and connection, safe and inclusive communities, social cohesiveness and social capital are key for individual and collective thriving. Internationally, it has been proven that councils who adopt wellbeing principles and apply wellbeing outcomes to their planning and service delivery have been successful in addressing many community issues such as social isolation, community safety, violence, vandalism, graffiti, crime and poor education and training outcomes.

Workshop Description

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of what is meant by wellbeing and the opportunity to explore how local government can be agents of wellbeing. The principles of wellbeing and how they inform and shape council policy, urban planning and service delivery will be examined as well as how a wellbeing focus contributes to addressing many of the social issues facing our communities.

 

There are several internationally recognised wellbeing models and frameworks as well as local models such as Whare Tapa Whā. Based on the determinants of wellbeing and frameworks it is possible to develop an evidence-based programme logic with clear wellbeing outcomes and indicators and evaluation tools.

The wellbeing determinants, frameworks and outcomes will be covered comprehensively in the workshop including Treasury’s Living Standards Framework.

It will offer a framework for local government to apply a wellbeing lens to its work and deliverables as well and wellbeing outcomes and indicators

 

Tools such as the Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool provides a systematic approach to assessing the impact of public policy, resource management and planning and programme delivery on mental wellbeing. A summary of the tool will be given.

 

Workshop Locations in 2020

Click on location for workshop details and online registration

“Tangata aka ana I te kāenga, te tūranga ki te marae, tau ana.”​ - “A person nurtured in the community contributes strongly to society.”

The government has placed wellbeing at the centre of its social and economic policy. Essential elements of wellbeing are safe and inclusive social environments and well communities, the business of local government.

 

Become more familiar with wellbeing principles, and how local government can be agents of wellbeing. An opportunity to look at how to orient long term community plans, recreation facilities, public transport and urban development towards a wellbeing framework.

 

Hear from an experienced wellbeing specialist who has lectured and implemented numerous wellbeing programmes at the local, national and international levels

Topics covered                                                                                                                                 This workshop would be of value to:

  • Defining Wellbeing                                                                                                                     Local and regional council               

  • Social and cultural determinants of wellbeing                                                                             Iwi trust boards 

  • Local government as an agent of wellbeing                                                                                Public health services

  • Applying wellbeing principles to policy, urban planning and community development               Safer Community Councils

  • Measuring Mental Wellbeing  - Indicators and outcomes

  • Overview of Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment Tool

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Me mahi tahi tautou mo te oranga o te katoa   -  Working together for the wellbeing of everyone

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